Just keeping track of the journey..



(Source: bishopdane)

1:43 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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suitep:

Firefighters in Leavenworth today, posted every 100 yards, keeping the fire from jumping the Wenatchee River. This is over the pass from Seattle and we could see all the smoke from various fires from the plane.

Stay safe, people.

5:40 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.

Anna Quindlen, How Reading Changed My Life (via quirkbooks)
2:35 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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maddieonthings:

I’d never been to the Massachusetts coast, figured I’d come say hi (Wingaersheek Beach, MA)

12:28 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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pianoxamerica:

It’s easy to say, but not so easy to do

12:28 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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danscapephotography:

The smoke makes or great looking sunset but it also serves as a reminder of the troubles out Washington neighbors to the west are facing.

10:19 am, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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horsebackwriter:

10 Rules to Live by in Evacuations with Horses from Wildfires or Natural Disasters:
1. TEACH YOUR HORSE TO LOAD (and tie)! And I mean immediately step into a trailer.2. Take at least one bale of hay and a BUCKET, you never know where your horse is going to end up.3. No matter what, if you take your horses or not, MAKE SURE you take your proof of ownership/BRAND INSPECTIONS! This will help you prove the horses are yours later on! (Photos work in non brand inspection areas!)4. If you CANNOT TAKE your horse, TURN THEM LOOSE! They have great survival instincts, its better than dying in a locked barn.5. IF YOU TURN THEM LOOSE, write your phone number on them in some way! Spay paint/shoe polish, whatever you can find.6. If you turn them loose TAKE THEIR HALTERS OFF! Imagine all the debris your horse is going to encounter! You don’t want them caught on!7. If you turn them loose, LOCK THEM OUT OF THEIR BARN/PEN/STALL/YARD. They WILL go back!8. If you take your horse to an evacuation center, it is still a good idea to have your horse marked in some way. Sometimes evacuation centers have to evacuate!9. If you take your horse in a trailer, PLEASE tie them if you safely can! I cannot count how many times we were evacuating and found a loose horse we needed to load with ours, if the horses are loose in the trailer that is a disaster waiting to happen.10. If your horse is in a large pasture area, cut the fence in corners and leave gates open! When horses can’t find their way in smoke/debris they will follow fence lines.For more info: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/livestk/01817.htm

horsebackwriter:

10 Rules to Live by in Evacuations with Horses from Wildfires or Natural Disasters:

1. TEACH YOUR HORSE TO LOAD (and tie)! And I mean immediately step into a trailer.

2. Take at least one bale of hay and a BUCKET, you never know where your horse is going to end up.

3. No matter what, if you take your horses or not, MAKE SURE you take your proof of ownership/BRAND INSPECTIONS! This will help you prove the horses are yours later on! (Photos work in non brand inspection areas!)

4. If you CANNOT TAKE your horse, TURN THEM LOOSE! They have great survival instincts, its better than dying in a locked barn.

5. IF YOU TURN THEM LOOSE, write your phone number on them in some way! Spay paint/shoe polish, whatever you can find.

6. If you turn them loose TAKE THEIR HALTERS OFF! Imagine all the debris your horse is going to encounter! You don’t want them caught on!

7. If you turn them loose, LOCK THEM OUT OF THEIR BARN/PEN/STALL/YARD. They WILL go back!

8. If you take your horse to an evacuation center, it is still a good idea to have your horse marked in some way. 
Sometimes evacuation centers have to evacuate!

9. If you take your horse in a trailer, PLEASE tie them if you safely can! I cannot count how many times we were evacuating and found a loose horse we needed to load with ours, if the horses are loose in the trailer that is a disaster waiting to happen.

10. If your horse is in a large pasture area, cut the fence in corners and leave gates open! When horses can’t find their way in smoke/debris they will follow fence lines.

For more info: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/livestk/01817.htm

12:34 am, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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2:59 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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2:51 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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(Source: mishmashpics)

2:49 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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Age shouldn’t affect you. You’re either marvelous or you’re boring.

Morrissey *Glamour (via 69honeybeez1)

(Source: glamour)

2:36 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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(Source: memewhore)

7:08 pm, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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angelclark:

Elephant Raju Cries After Being Rescued From 50 Years Of Suffering In Chains 

This heartbreaking story is about as elephant Raju from India that had an incredibly rough life. After being poached from his mother he was thrown from one owner to another, until he was left living in terrible conditions with no shelter at night, being used as a beggars prop all day long. Raju survived only from passing tourists and sometimes had to eat plastic and paper while being chained 24 hours a day. A wildlife organisation SOS-UK could not stand the injustice and decided to save him in a daring midnight rescue operation.

The elephant, realizing he was being saved, started to cry: “It was incredibly emotional. We knew in our hearts he realised he was being freed” – claims Pooja Binepal, one of the rescuers in an interview with Presspeople. “Tears began to roll down Raju’s face. Some no doubt were due to the pain but he also seemed to sense that change was coming. He felt hope for the first time” – says another rescuer Kartick.

10:30 am, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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electricmudpuppy:

sixpenceee:

Sir Nicholas Winton is a humanitarian who organized a rescue operation that saved the lives of 669 Jewish Czechoslovakia children from Nazi death camps, and brought them to the safety of Great Britain between the years 1938-1939.

After the war, his efforts remained unknown. But in 1988, Winton’s wife Grete found the scrapbook from 1939 with the complete list of children’s names and photos. Sir Nicholas Winton is sitting in an audience of Jewish Czechoslovakian people who he saved 50 years before.

WATCH FULL VIDEO HERE

Actually crying

11:25 am, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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10:43 am, reblogged by thestorykeeper
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